Most mints, even kosher ones, put little more than a dent in bad breath

By - Bad Breath Expert

SUMMARY:  Chewing a breath mint is a common way to try to get rid of halitosis, often when a toothbrush or specialty breath freshening rinse is unavailable. For those who eat kosher meals, the New York Post reports that kosher mints have recently become available, although the ability of most mints to eliminate bad breath is negligible.

Posted: April 6, 2011

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Chewing a breath mint is a common way to try to get rid of halitosis, often when a toothbrush or specialty breath freshening rinse is unavailable. For those who eat kosher meals, the New York Post reports that kosher mints have recently become available, although the ability of most mints to eliminate bad breath is negligible.

The creator, Adam Mintz, told the newspaper he came up with idea after several friends joked about his name during a wedding. The New Yorker and rabbi realized that most mints cannot be consumed by orthodox Jews like himself because they contain non-kosher gelatin.

Mintz jumped at the opportunity, and today his mints may be found on shelves at the Carnegie Deli and Barney Greengrass, the news source reported.

While Mintz's mints fill a hole in the breath-freshening market, they may not do any more than traditional mints to reduce bad breath.

Halitosis occurs when odor-causing bacteria consume food particles, sugars and oils in the mouth and emit pungent sulfurous compounds. Reducing oral odor means killing or eliminating these microbes, and while breath mints mask the smell at first, they ultimately give microorganisms something to feed on.

Individuals with bad breath may consider replacing these bacteria with other strains by using oral care probiotics, like the Aktiv K-12 Probiotic Kit.

Probiotics S. salivarius K12
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lozenges for dry mouth
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