Shakespeare and his bad-breathed Mistress

By - Bad Breath Expert

Posted: October 11, 2007

In related literature, Shakespeare lovingly writes about his bad-breathed lady in Sonnet 130. Bad breath was so common in Elizabethan England, it even turned up in Shakespeare's writing. I wonder what Shakespeare would have to say about Therabreath....maybe something like, "Oh my mistress, Therabreath thou must seek, it really works, thou breath improvest in a week." Enjoy. :)

Sonnet 130


My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.

Shakespeare

 


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