Do crooked teeth equal bad breath?

By - Bad Breath Expert

SUMMARY:  It's a common question, but whether or not teeth are straight does not affect halitosis as much as you might think. Sure, having healthy, white, straight teeth typically indicates good oral hygiene habits, but that doesn't mean that it is impossible to avoid bad breath with teeth that aren't picket-fence straight.

Posted: May 19, 2011

crooked teeth - fight dry mouth, a canker sore or canker sores, tonsil stones, halitosis, bad breath and gum disease with TheraBreath

It's a common question, but whether or not teeth are straight does not affect halitosis as much as you might think. Sure, having healthy, white, straight teeth typically indicates good oral hygiene habits, but that doesn't mean that it is impossible to avoid bad breath with teeth that aren't picket-fence straight.

AsiaOne Health recently published an article stating that straight teeth are easier to clean than those that are crooked, meaning that over time, individuals with misaligned chompers are more likely to develop bad breath.

The accuracy of this notion is debatable. Individuals who brush regularly, floss, scrape their tongues, rinse with a specialty breath freshener and take a daily oral care probiotic pill are very unlikely to have oral odor, no matter how parallel their pearly whites are.

Furthermore, the connection between crooked teeth and poor oral care is partially a cultural myth, according to reader-written comments posted to one of the UK Guardian's Notes and Queries sections. In the column, many Britons noted that they do not suffer from halitosis any more than their American cousins.

By neutralizing odors with a specialty rinse, individuals with straight teeth, crooked teeth or no teeth at all can minimize bad breath.

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