Dieters risk halitosis

By - Bad Breath Expert

SUMMARY:  The decision to go on a diet can help individuals shed excess weight, which may provide a range of health benefits. However, if dieting is not done correctly, these people risk developing bad breath.

Posted: July 20, 2010

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The decision to go on a diet can help individuals shed excess weight, which may provide a range of health benefits. However, if dieting is not done correctly, these people risk developing bad breath.

Low-carbohydrate and high-protein diets cause the body to burn fat stores for fuel. This results in a state called ketosis, in which individuals feel less hungry and may be able to reduce their body weight, according to WebMD.

However, if dieters aren't paying close attention to their nutrient intake during ketosis, they risk many health complications, including bad breath. Keri Gans, a spokesperson for the American Diet Association, told the Seattle Times that the condition can be dangerous for many reasons, but that halitosis is the first warning sign of a problem.

"The short-term ketosis problem is bad breath," she told the news source, adding that blood pH can change, becoming more acidic. This can cause unpleasant odors to emanate from the gut, leading to bad breath.

In order to avoid this situation, dieters may want to choose plans that don't involve bringing the body into ketosis, or using specialty breath-freshening products while they are losing weight.

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